Check Windows Services statuses using Powershell

PowerShell is a great and essential “scripting” (the scripting is just one of the many things this language can do) tool. It not only helps save you time, it also provides greater flexibility to execute repeated tasks manually or via scheduled tasks. Almost all Windows roles and features ship with PowerShell cmdlets. Once of the most common tasks, specially on server machines, is to check regularly the status of a specific service. Read More …

Securing RDP Connections using TLS certificates

Remote Desktop has been the must as remote administration tool for many IT professionals and sadly many even expose it to the internet leading to brutefoce attacks and Man in the Middle attacks in the past (and even during this period). Using TLS certificates can improve the security and the default access method to critical systems, even if those systems are reached only on internal business LAN environments. Read More …

MacOS X – Managing Gatekeeper (Terminal)

Gatekeeper is a feature available on MacOS X systems to block, by default, any application that is not installed from the Apple Store, for security reasons (all apps on Apple Store are validated and certified by the original developers). Let’s see how to manage this feature on MacOS X systems by accessing to it using command line (using Terminal). Read More …

Powershell – How to use Transcripts to keep history of commands and output

The primary tool for logging Powershell activity has been the Start-Transcript cmdlet. Simply enter this cmdlet followed by a path and filename for the log file that you want to create. PowerShell will populate the log file with every subsequent command that is entered. Read More …

Enable WinRM with Group Policy for PowerShell Remoting

PowerShell Remoting really can makes a routine work a lot easier, but it requires quite a bit of work to get all the remote computers ready to take the remoting calls, such as automatically start Windows Remote Management service. Read More …